Stuff

Woman Finds Biological Mom Through Facebook In Just 12 Freaking Hours

By  | 

whitney facebook adoptionSince its inception, Facebook has transformed the way we communicate, some ways better than others. For every story we hear about cyberbullying and breastfeeding censorship, there are plenty of stories like this next one that make me think being part of a social media network can be worth it. Like when the platform helps connect a biological mother and daughter after 22 years.

Whitney Brock was reportedly adopted by her mother Teresa in 1991, from St. Mary’s Hospital in Evansville, Indiana. While she had a happy and idyllic childhood, she always wondered about her biological mother, whether she cared about her and missed her. So like many other people, she took her mission to Facebook, making a post that stated:

“I’m looking for my birthmother. I was born at St. Mary’s Hospital in Evansville Indiana on 02/06/1991. Her name was Jennifer L. Moorehead. Please share & help me out.”

The response was almost immediate and much bigger than Whitney expected, quickly gaining over 3,000 likes within hours. One message she received was from a Florida woman who had done some research. She gave Whitney a list of five possible phone numbers for her potential biological mom. Surprisingly, Whitney found her biological mother on the very first call. The most amazing part? From the time she posted the plea until the time she made that fateful phone call, only 12 hours had passed.

Whitney, her biological mom and her biological aunt soon made plans and met up at a restaurant in Evansville. Whitney even brought along her young daughter Rylan, making the reunion even more special. Whitney’s mom Teresa was very supportive of her daughter’s decision, saying that she understood the curiosity, and wanted her daughter to pursue it, making her a mom of the year nominee in my book.

Social media can often be frustrating and annoying. Between the political bullies who push their opinions down your throat, the unabashed “like” seekers who use photos of kids with cancer to promote their pages, I see something on the daily that makes me regret my various accounts. But stuff like this makes it almost worth it.

[brightcove_vid playerid=”9″ flashvars=”videoId=2675945330001&playerID=1684512073001&playerKey=AQ~~,AAAACC1lJjE~,eO0k1bjplevyL8YPi3NQccQnZmHFkpb9&domain=embed&dynamicStreaming=true”]

(photo: Facebook)