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5th-Grader Prevented From Delivering Gay Marriage Speech Gets A Better Audience

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Kameron SladeFifth-grader Kameron Slade sure received some sour news back in June when he was informed that he couldn’t deliver his award-winning speech about same-sex marriage to his school. Despite Kameron’s speech winning a class competition, the Queens kid was told that the subject matter was “inappropriate,” according to the Huffington Post, and would not be heard in the school-wide competition at PS 195. Schools chancellor Dennis Walcott reportedly conceded to allow Kameron to share his words during a special assembly (after parents were informed of the topic). The mini advocate was also able to deliver his argument on NY1 as well. But the most recent stop on this kid’s gay marriage tour is the City Council!

Following the one year anniversary of New York state’s recognition of same-sex marriage, New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn invited Kameron to share his sentiments. In a sharp little grey suit and glasses, Kamerson describes his own understanding of family coupled with his personal experience with same-sex parents, friends of his mother’s. He details his stance on “same-gender marriage” are as follows:

Some people are for same-gender marriage, while others are against it. Like President Obama, I believe that all people should have the right to marry whoever they want. Marriage is about love, support, and commitment. So who are we to judge? If we judge people like this, this is a form of prejudice. We must learn to accept all differences…My mom is very open with me about same-gender marriage. However, some adults may feel uncomfortable and think it’s inappropriate to talk about this to children. I think adults must realize that as children get older, they become aware of these mature issues that are going on in the world. If children read or watch the news, they can also learn about things like same-gender marriage, so what’s the point in trying to hide it?

That isn’t to say all young people are uniformly for same-sex marriage, what with 16-year-old Madeleine McAulay enduring a misogynistic tirade for sharing her opposing views not too long ago. But whether kids are making YouTube videos describing marriage as “a covenant with God” or “about love, support, and commitment,” children should be allowed a respected seat at the table. Silencing kids on issues that they’re passionate about doesn’t bode well for any of these continuing conversations, something the grownups would do well to remember.

[nytimes id=”100000001683171″]